3 Plants Your Dog And Cat Should Avoid

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It’s springtime and the plants and trees in your neighborhood are blooming with new flowers. The beauty of the blossoms and the scent may attract your dogs and cats, but for a few of them beware.
We don’t want to be alarmists. For the most part, your furry friend knows what to avoid or quickly learns what to avoid after suffering some mild poisoning. But if you have a new puppy or kitten, you may want to keep an eye out for three common plants that you may not know are toxic.

DAFFODILS

These flowers contain lycorine, which triggers vomiting. If your pet eats the bulb, plant or flower it can also cause diarrhea, abdominal pain, and even possible cardiac arrhythmias or respiratory depression. Crystals found in the outer layer can also cause severe tissue irritation and secondary drooling.

RHODODENDRON

Beautiful and toxic. Not just for dogs, for humans too, so don’t eat them either. These can be mildly to severely poisonous for dogs, depending on the amount ingested, as well as the hybrid of the plant (which comes in various colors). They can suffer from burning on the lips and mouth, salivation, nausea, severe vomiting, coma, and it can be lethal. It doesn’t take much to get a dog sick; in fact, if an animal ingests as little as 0.2% of their body weight in any part of the plant, they can be serverely poisoned.

TULIPS and HYACINTHS

The poison in these plants are mostly concentrated in the bulb and the toxicity is mild to moderate. The biggest concern is when a dog digs up a freshly planted bulb. When ingested by a dog the symptom may include drooling, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, increased heart rate, and breathing.

OTHER TOXIC PLANTS

For a full list of toxic plants, you can check out the three links below:
Toxic Plants in the Pacific Northwest
Oregon Veterinary Medical Association List of Poisonous Plants
Common Backyard Plants that May be Poisonous

WHAT IF MY DOG or CAT is POISONED?

Call your veterinary hospital right away. Gresham Animal Hospital is equipped to provide all the services and treatments your pet needs under one roof. Keep Gresham Animal Hospital in mind next time your dog or cat needs a checkup, shots, or vaccines. Give us a call at 503.666.1600 to schedule an appointment today.

“You’ll see how much we know, and you’ll know how much we care.”

 

What is Happening in Your Pet’s Brain When They See You

Gresham Animal Hospital_What is Happening in Your Pets Brain When They See You
First, any pet owner knows that your furry (or feathered) family member recognizes you and the rest of the household. There is, however, some difference as to how your pet may greet you when you first come home. If you are a cat owner, you may get different shades of aloofness. Birds can be the most excitable of the bunch—unless, that is, you have an Energizer puppy. Well, it seems that these differences in the way you are received by your pet all comes down to how they perceive you. Let’s break down the perceptions for each type of pet.

CATS THINK YOU ARE ANOTHER CAT

According to John Bradshaw, a cat-behavior expert at the University of Bristol, cats treat humans like other cats. Putting their tails up in the air, rubbing around our legs, and sitting beside us and grooming us is exactly what cats do to each other. Sure, they can tell humans are a different shape and larger, but socially they treat humans as their peers. Your cat thinks you are just a bigger version of them. This also makes sense why cats are more aloof than a dog or bird. Cats, in general, are not highly social animals. In fact, the largest reason cats go to the hospital is because they get in fights with other cats.
Most cat owners know that their pet has learned to tolerate them—even love them. A good indication is when your cat kneads you, they are signaling that they trust you and are hoping for some type of grooming in exchange—just as their mothers would.

DOGS KNOW YOU ARE HUMAN AND WANT TO PLEASE YOU

While dogs and cats have roughly the same intelligence, the biggest difference is the behavior that dogs display around humans. Where cats socially treat humans as they would other cats, most dogs were bred to perform for humans. So they are constantly watching for cues on how to act and how to behave.  Jobs like hunting, fetching, and herding all require dogs to take cues from their owners. If it seems like dogs pay more attention to their human counterparts it is because they are.
Dogs also take it a step further. They can determine how you are feeling and read facial cues. What is also interesting is dogs are actually more conscious of these cues than humans are. Humans develop an unconscious understanding of another human’s tone of voice, body posture, and even pheromones. Dogs pick these up too, but on a more conscious level where they are actively processing these cues to determine how to behave.

CAN A BIRD LOVE?

Science won’t go as far as saying love, but they are comfortable using the terms “emotional bond” or “emotional attachment.” They qualify these types of bonds and attachments as emotional because the bird can develop these bonds regardless of who feeds them. In other words, it is not a transactional bond—it is truly an emotional one that usually lasts the entire bird’s life. It is not unusual for a bird to pick one household member to follow around the house—even if they are not the one who feeds it.
There are multiple factors that may determine how a bird chooses to bond with a human (or even other pets), however, the biggest factor is who gets to the bird first. The strongest bonds develop early.

THE TAKEAWAY

Your pet loves you. Even if it’s in different ways and for different reasons, depending on the type of pet. If your cat is more social, they will see you as a momma. A dog is truly your best friend and is constantly trying to read you. They can read you so well that they might be able to beat you at poker. A bird’s bond is permanent and unshakable. Most birds mate for life and are capable of mourning the loss of a loved one.
So when your cat seems to ignore you, or your dog is naughty, or even if your bird seems to be distracted. Know that they still love you.
Gresham Animal Hospital is equipped to provide the services and treatment your pet needs under one roof. Keep Gresham Animal Hospital in mind next time your dog or cat needs a checkup, shots, or vaccines. Give us a call at 503.666.1600 to schedule an appointment today.

“You’ll see how much we know, and you’ll know how much we care.”

 

Spay and Neuter: Fixing What is Not Broken

Gresham Animal Hospital_Spay and Neuter_Fixing What is Not Broken
February is Spay/Neuter Awareness Month. Spay and neuter is the #1 way to end pet homelessness before it begins. The reason why awareness starts in February is to encourage owners to sterilize their pets before the spring and summer months when there is a rampant overproduction of puppies and kittens. With overproduction, animal shelters experience an increase in animal intake.
The biggest challenge for pet owners is not whether they should fix their pets—but when. Statistics provided by the National Council of Pet Population reports 79% of pet owners don’t know when they should spay or neuter their pets. According to Gresham Animal Hospital’s Spay and Neuter Page we recommend ideally it should be between 3 and 6 months of age.  Plus, it’s a short procedure that can be done in a few hours.
For the rest of you, we have four benefits to getting your pet spayed or neutered. Below are the main bullet points followed with more details for each item.

BENEFITS OF SPAYING OR NEUTURING YOU PET

  • Fight overpopulation and crowded shelters
  • Your pets live longer
  • Lower medical costs
  • Reduce undesirable behaviors

FIGHT OVERPOPULATION AND CROWDED SHELTERS

Let’s address the sad news first—don’t worry, we will get to the positive benefits after these alarming statistics. There are an estimated 6-8 million homeless animals entering animal shelters every year. Barely half of these animals are adopted. According to the Humane Society, nationwide there are 2.7 million healthy, adoptable cats and dogs are euthanized in shelters annually.

YOUR PETS LIVE LONGER & LOWER RISK OF PET DISEASE

Now we can talk about the positive benefits. Your pets statistically live longer! A USA today article reports that neutered male dogs live 18% longer and spayed female dogs live 23% longer. There are two factors that extend the life of altered pets. After they are altered, they have less reason to roam. Another factor is the reduced risk of certain types of cancers.

LOWER MEDICAL COSTS

A family pet is worth every penny to increase its health, but lower medical costs also means fewer medical procedures, and less discomfort for your furriest member of the family. The biggest risk of an unaltered pet is the reproductive system. Procedures on the reproductive system can run into the thousands.

REDUCE UNDESIRABLE BEHAVIORS

Roaming, aggression, and excessive barking are undesirable behaviors that can be reduced by spay and neutering in both cats and dogs. The biggest behavioral issue is marking or spraying.
Unneutered dogs are more prone to urine-marking (lifting their leg). This is mostly true with male dogs, but female dogs may do it, too. Neutering your dog should reduce urine-marking and may stop it altogether.
For cats, the urge to spray is extremely strong in an intact cat, and the simplest solution is to get yours neutered or spayed by 4 months of age before there’s even a problem. Neutering solves 90 percent of all marking issues, even in cats that have been doing it for a while. It can also minimize howling, the urge to roam and fight with other males.

PASS ON THE MESSAGE

We may not be able to save all 2.7 million cats and dogs that get euthanized every year, but we can definitely reduce it. Most pet owners are on board with spaying and neutering, but just don’t know when to do it. Let them know it can be done between 3-6 months of age. If they don’t have time to read this blog, tell them to go straight to the video below.
 

Gresham Animal Hospital is equipped to provide the services and treatment your pet needs under one roof. Keep Gresham Animal Hospital in mind next time your dog or cat needs a checkup, shots, or vaccines. Give us a call at 503.666.1600 to schedule an appointment today.

“You’ll see how much we know, and you’ll know how much we care.”

 

Top Pet Trends for 2019

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Make 2019 all about smart choices for not just yourself, but also your beloved pets. Aside from the same old annual resolutions—eat better, exercise out more often, work less (or more—depending on your priorities, etc.)—make 2019 the year that you and your pets live your absolute best lives. Now, that is not to say you aren’t doing just that already, but these new trends might inspire you to try something new.

Technology will be big again in 2019

Many pet parents are known to invest in technology for the health and safety of their furry family members. A majority of pet owners already microchip their pets. Many have also done DNA testing to determine allergies or potential health problems. Pet health continues to become a priority as owners become more aware of best health practices. This year will be known as the year for pet apps on mobile devices for pet health.

Think Fitbit for Pets

Products like FitBark attach to your dog’s collar. It monitors activity levels, quality of sleep, distance traveled, calories burned, and overall health and behavior 24/7. The best part of FitBark is it connects to your own health device. You can link it to your Fitbit, Apple Healthkit or Google Fit device (or just use your iOS or Android phone to track your steps) and chart progress side-by-side. Check out FitBark

HI-Tech Tracking with the Whistle

The Whistle doesn’t hook up to your health device, but it does do some pet activity monitoring. Its features are more focused on tracking your dog using a combination of cellular and GPS technology to give you the fastest and most accurate tracking nationwide. Unlike Bluetooth-only trackers which have a range of 50 feet, Whistle 3 will locate your pet down the street or 3,000 miles away! Check out Whistle.

DNA Testing for Dog (we will get to cats too)

While many products have been around for a while, many predict there will be an uptick in DNA testing for dogs and cats. Let’s start with the top two popular options for dogs. When deciding on DNA testing for your dog some are better at defining ancestry and breed while others are better at determining risk of diseases. Wisdom Panel is known for having the largest breed database (over 350 breeds). While Embark only has a database of 250, they test for over 165 diseases. With their comprehensive genetic testing, you can better plan for healthy aging with information on everything from genetic diseases to drug sensitivities. Keep your dog healthy longer by testing for genetic diseases that occur later in life including glaucoma, degenerative myelopathy, and dilated cardiomyopathy, three of the most common adult-onset diseases in dogs.

Cats can get DNA tests too!

The cat DNA testing industry is smaller and newer, but there are a couple of competitors out there that want to help you identify your cat breed. Basepaws is the newest DNA testing kit out there and can track potential health issues and determine ancestry. A neat feature of Basepaws is they will continually update you as they grow their database of health and ancestry markers. HomeDNA is the leader in Cat DNA and a little bit more spendy. For the extra bucks you get the results are faster and an interactive on line LifePlan to help with your cat’s lifetime health needs

Are you trendy?

Have you aleady owned or tried some of these products? The overall trend this year are tools providing insights to our pet’s health and that is being driven by technology and DNA testing.  The health of your pets is always a trend at Gresham Animal Hospital.
Gresham Animal Hospital is equipped to provide the service and treatment your pet needs under one roof. Keep Gresham Animal Hospital in mind next time your dog or cat needs a checkup, shots, or vaccines. Give us a call at 503.666.1600 to schedule an appointment today.

“You’ll see how much we know, and you’ll know how much we care.”

5 Feline-Friendly Ways to Cat Proof Your Christmas Tree

Gresham Animal Hospital_5 Feline-Friendly Ways to Cat Proof Your Christmas Tree
If you have had your cat(s) for a while, you may have already found your own solutions for keeping both your tree and your cat safe from the hazards of frolic and play. New owners, however, may find out that bringing home a Christmas tree (or any plant during the year) is considered fair game for most cats.
From deciding what tree to buy to setting it up and decorating, here are some useful tips to help keep your cats and tree from hurting each other. The safest solution is an artificial tree, especially if your cat is notorious for eating what it shouldn’t. These tips are for those who opt for the real thing.

IT’S ALL ABOUT THAT BASE

Once that tree falls over, it is a danger for your kitty and a mess to pick up. If you can keep the tree upright, you have won most the battle. You have two options. The first is to spend a little cash on a sturdier tree stand. Popular Mechanics has a great 2018 Top Ten Tree Stands list. The list is based on multiple factors like ease of use, the amount of water it can hold, and of course, sturdiness. The best one for cats is probably the Goliath. The second option is to get a smaller tree with fuller branches at the base.

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION

Christmas trees are not just where the presents go, it is also the focal point of your holiday décor and that means there are only a few places where it will look just right. This means you may have to look around to make sure you are not tempting your cat with nearby launch pads to jump onto the tree. A couch or table next to the tree is an invitation for cats to pounce from a perch.

HOLD YOUR HORSES (ORNAMENTS)

For some cats, if you wait a few days before you put up your ornaments, they can become bored with the tree. Give them a chance to get used to the tree and investigate it before you put up all those tempting decorations.

LOW-HANGING FRUIT (AGAIN ORNAMENTS)

A cat’s perspective is going to be below the tree. If you can keep the most tempting ornaments from the bottom, it can prevent the cats from becoming interested. The shinier the ornaments below, the more tempting the cat will be to explore all the way up the tree.

AGENT ORANGE (PEEL)

Cats naturally hate the scent of oranges, so keep orange peels under the tree to repel your cat. If it’s a plastic tree, a small amount of Citronella oil shaken into a bottle of water and misted on to the tree makes it smell unpleasant to the cat but fresh and citrus-like to you. You can apply the scent around the base.
But don’t be discouraged when decorating your home for the holidays, because there are ways to ensure a safe Christmas tree for cats. And there are plenty of decorations you can use to cheer up your home that won’t break and won’t pose pet safety hazards for your beloved feline.
Have a safe holiday season from everyone at Gresham Animal Hospital!
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Gresham Animal Hospital is equipped to provide the service and treatment your pet needs under one roof. Keep Gresham Animal Hospital in mind next time your dog or cat needs a checkup, shots, or vaccines. Give us a call at 503.666.1600 to schedule an appointment today.

“You’ll see how much we know, and you’ll know how much we care.”

 

Helping Your Dog Adjust To Shorter Days

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These days, many pet owners are leaving before dawn and returning home long after dusk. Managing the shorter days and the dearth of sunlight can be difficult for us humans, but it can be especially rough on our pet companions. Here are a few tips to keep your dogs (and to some extent, cats) healthy and well adjusted.

Go For A Walk

Invest in a reflective collar and find a comfortable route for early morning and evening walks. A vigorous walk once a day is great for you and your pets mental health which is especially tender during cold, dark winter months.

More Calories

If your dog is a healthy weight, gradually introduce more fat into your dog’s diet.  Cold weather requires more calories to maintain body temperature Help their body adjust to winter weather and keep them warm by boosting their caloric intake.

Brush More Often

Brush your pets out more often when the weather turns chilly. As our long-hair pets adjust to lower temperatures their hair can become stiff and matted a lot quicker than it would in the short-haircut days of summer.

Face the Sun

Raising your pet’s bed off of the floor will keep them warmer, facing their bed toward south-facing windows will also give them the full benefit of the occasional sunny day.
Gresham Animal Hospital is equipped to provide the service and treatment your pet needs under one roof. Keep Gresham Animal Hospital in mind next time your dog or cat needs a checkup, shots, or vaccines. Give us a call at 503.666.1600 to schedule an appointment today.

“You’ll see how much we know, and you’ll know how much we care.”

 
 

No Thanksgiving Bones for Fido. Why Most Bones are Bad.

Gresham Animal Hospital_No Thanksgiving Bones for Fido. Why Most Bones are Bad
Many dog owners know that bones, especially cooked turkey bones, can be bad for dogs. This doesn’t stop the number of increased vet visits during the holidays for bone-related injuries.
There could be many factors why owners are still giving dog bones as a treat, after all, giving a dog a bone is a cliché. Many of us grew up during a time when dogs got ALL the leftovers. So don’t feel bad, here is an opportunity to find out why bones, and especially cooked bones, are bad for your furry family member.
The cooking process makes bones more brittle, increasing the likelihood they might splinter and cause internal injury to your dog. Plus, nutrition-wise, cooking can also remove the nutrition contained in bones. This splintering of the bones can cause injuries from the mouth to the tail-end of your pup, so lets start with the mouth injuries and work our way down.

MOUTH AND TONGUE

Cooked bird bones can splinter after the first bite. These splinters are naturally pointy and sharp and can cause a bloody mouth or pierce the tongue.

LOOPED AROUND the JAW

Not only is this painful for your pooch, but also this is also frightening to your dog. This usually requires a trip to the veterinarian.

ESOPHOGUS or WINDPIPE

Before those bones get to the stomach they need to go down the esophagus, even it makes it pass the esophagus, your dog can still gag and bring the splintered bone back up. This is also true if the dog accidently inhales while eating—except this will impact her breathing.

STOMACH and INTESTINES

Injury to this area almost always results in surgery. If the bone does damage to the stomach or intestine.

CONSTIPATION

Constipation can happen for two reasons. One, like all the prior risks we mentioned, those bone fragments can get stuck and cause other food not to pass. Two, the calcium in bones are also a stool firming agent.
We want your best friend to stay healthy this holiday season. There are plenty of treat alternatives and human food is rarely a good option for fido.
Gresham Animal Hospital is equipped to provide the service and treatment your pet needs under one roof. Keep Gresham Animal Hospital in mind next time your dog or cat needs a checkup, shots, or vaccines. Give us a call at 503.666.1600 to schedule an appointment today.

“You’ll see how much we know, and you’ll know how much we care.”

 

National Adopt a Shelter Dog Month

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OVERCROWDING AN ISSUE FOR SHELTERS

The term lifesaver is used so often in our conversations, we sometimes forget that we are capable of literally saving lives every day.
Shelters are usually the last chance for a dog or cat. The goal for the shelter is to upgrade “last chance” to “second chance.” The biggest challenge facing shelters today is the risk of overpopulation and funding for the resources to care for strays, rescues, and abandoned pets. When you adopt a pet from a shelter you help reduce overpopulation and provide support to a facility and a staff that is trying to provide a second chance.
Currently half the dogs and cats that enter shelters get adopted. Sadly 20% of dogs get euthanized and 27% of cats get euthanized.

SUPPORT ADOPT A SHELTER DOG MONTH

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) and the American Humane Association (AHA) have deemed the month of October National Adopt a Shelter Dog Month and Adopt a Dog Month, respectively.

5 REASONS TO ADOPT A DOG

  1. YOU SAVE A DOG’s LIFE: Your new pup will never forget that you gave them a second chance.
  2. FIGHT OVERPOPULATION: The shelters continue to fight overpopulation, you can help.
  3. FIGHT PUPPY MILLS: When you buy a dog at If you buy a dog from a pet store, online seller or flea market, you risk buying from a puppy mill.
  4. ADOPT AN ADULT: Some adult pets are already trained, and they are the most at-risk for being euthanized.
  5. IT COST LESS: Most shelters cover the cost of spaying and neutering, first vaccinations and most even cover microchipping. This is a huge savings in up-front cost of a new pet. Depending on the pet it may already be housebroken and trained.

REASON NUMBER 6

Trade out those selfies on Facebook and Instagram with pictures of your new companion.

HELP CELEBRATE ADOPT A SHELTER DOG MONTH

Here are three ways you can help the cause.

  1. Donate your Facebook status. Just paste this message into the “What’s on your mind?” box at the top of your page: “October is Adopt-A-Shelter-Dog Month. Save a life: Adopt a dog! https://www.petfinder.com
  2. Tweet, retweet and repeat the following (or your own brilliant message): “October is Adopt-A-Shelter-Dog Month. Save a life: Adopt a dog! https://www.petfinder.com #savedogs”
  3. Contact your local shelter or rescue group (you can search for groups near you here) and ask if they have a donation wish list or other flyer they’d like to you to post around your office or neighborhood. They may be holding special events for Adopt-A-Shelter-Dog Month which you can help promote.

Gresham Animal Hospital is equipped to provide the service and treatment your pet needs under one roof. Keep Gresham Animal Hospital in mind next time your dog or cat needs a checkup, shots, or vaccines. Give us a call at 503.666.1600 to schedule an appointment today.

“You’ll see how much we know, and you’ll know how much we care.”

5 Signs Your Dog Has Back to School Separation Anxiety and How to Manage It

Battling back to school sadness for pets

CHANGE IN ROUTINE CAN BE STRESSFUL

In September, when vacations are over and kids head back to school, your dog will have to adjust to a new schedule. Dogs are a social animal by nature. The stark difference from enjoying endless days of frolicky fun and developing a strong bond with the kids all summer to the sudden back to school momentum of fall may spark the uneasiness of an empty and quiet house for your pets. This change in routine can cause your dog to suffer from separation anxiety or depression—to miss your kids—and even follow them to school.

CAN DOGS REALLY GET DEPRESSED?

No one knows for sure if dogs suffer from clinical depression like humans, but we certainly know they can experience mood and behavior changes. Here are 5 behavior changes that may indicate your dog is suffering from the blues of separation anxiety.

  1. Different eating habits (usually lack of an appetite)
  2. Obsessive barking
  3. Chewing furniture or pillows
  4. House soiling
  5. Pacing or hiding

HOW TO MANAGE DOGGIE ANXIETY

  1. If it’s not too late, prep your dogs for being alone for short periods of time instead of leaving her alone cold turkey.
  2. Exercise your dog before you leave. Exercise your dog when you come home. These activities will build new routines that your dog will look forward to.
  3. Try not have highly emotional departures and greetings. Prolonged goodbyes and exciting welcome homes will amp up your dog’s anxiety when you are gone.
  4. If you are going to be gone for more than 8 hours, consider doggy daycare.
  5. Leave sturdy interactive toys to occupy your dog while you are out. Take the time to figure out which toys stimulate your dog the most. Not all dogs are the same, some like chewable stuff, some like crinkle noises, some like squeaky noises. For some dogs, a simple ball is all it takes.

Be sure to check with your veterinarian to have your dog fully evaluated and correctly diagnosed before trying to manage these symptoms. There may be an underlying medical condition that may be misconstrued as separation anxiety.
Gresham Animal Hospital is equipped to provide the service and treatment your pet needs under one roof. Keep Gresham Animal Hospital in mind next time your dog or cat needs a checkup, shots, or vaccines. Give us a call at 503.666.1600 to schedule an appointment today.

“You’ll see how much we know, and you’ll know how much we care.”

A Simple Guide to Make Sure Your Dog and Cat Has All Its Immunization Shots

Gresham Animal Hospital_A Simple Guide to Make Sure Your Dog and Cat Has All Its Immunization Shots-1
National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM) is an annual observance held in August to highlight the importance of vaccination for people of all ages. If you are like most people, you consider your furry companions as a part of your family, which is why National Immunization Awareness Month also applies to cats and dogs. And if you are like most people you might need help knowing when to vaccinate your dog or your cat. While you should consult your private veterinarian, below is a good guideline of what immunizations are needed and when.

DOGS SHOULD BE GIVEN IMMUNIZATIONS FOR CORE DISEASES EVERY 1-3 YEARS:

Immunizations for Distemper

Distemper is a viral disease that results in fever, watery eyes, loss of energy, decreased appetite, vomiting, and in severe cases, brain damage. The distemper vaccine is typically administered in 3 doses, given when the animal is between 6 and 16 weeks old. Puppies should receive a booster after 1 year, and adult dogs at 3-year intervals thereafter.

Immunizations for Rabies

Rabies comes in a 1-year and a 3-year vaccine. Rabies is 100% fatal to dogs, and rabid animals pose a significant public health hazard to humans. For these reasons, the 1-year rabies vaccine is considered a core vaccine. It can be administered in a single dose to animals as young as 3 months of age. Like the 1-year vaccine, the 3-year rabies vaccine is administered in a single dose beginning when the animal is about 3 months of age. A single booster is recommended after 1 year and boosters at 3-year intervals thereafter.

Immunizations for Adenovirus

This is also known as canine hepatitis. If untreated, canine hepatitis can result in severe liver damage or even death. Viral hepatitis in dogs is a contagious illness spread by contact with urine or feces from infected animals. The vaccine is typically administered in 3 doses, given when the animal is between 6 and 16 weeks old. Puppies should receive a booster after 1 year, and adult dogs at 3-year intervals thereafter.

Immunizations for Bordetella (Parvovirus)

Bordetella is more dangerous and severe for puppies than adults. It is a bacterial illness that is at greatest risk for dogs that board with other dogs often—like show dogs. Vaccine schedules and forms vary; and both intranasal and injected forms of the vaccine are available. Booster frequency depends on risk for exposure.

CATS SHOULD BE GIVEN IMMUNIZATIONS, EVERY THREE YEARS, FOR CORE DISEASES SUCH AS:

Immunizations for Rhinotracheitis

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (FVR) is an infectious disease caused by feline herpesvirus type-1. As with other herpes viruses, the virus is very species specific, and is only known to cause infections in domestic and wild cats. The virus can infect cats of all ages.

Immunizations for Calicivirus

Feline calicivirus (FCV) typically causes upper respiratory disease in cats. It is one of the two major viral causes of respiratory infection in cats (feline herpesvirus type-1 is the other). Cats may experience mild symptoms, but some do suffer severe, life-threatening manifestations of this infection.
This is a core vaccine. All kittens and cats should receive this vaccination. It is generally given as part of a combination vaccine that also protects against FHV-1 and panleukopenia.
This vaccine is administered by subcutaneous injection (injection under the skin) or by intranasal delivery (nose drops).

Immunizations for Rabies

According to the CDC, in 2008-2009 alone, “three times more rabid cats were reported than rabid dogs.” Even if you have an indoor cat, it only takes a single day out and about to get rabies.

Immunizations for Distemper

Feline distemper is a disease more appropriately known as feline panleukopenia virus (FPV), which is sometimes also referred to as feline parvovirus. Despite the name, this contagious disease does not affect a cat’s temperament nor is it related to canine distemper.
Several available vaccines are indicated for preventing disease associated with FPV. Most of the available FPV vaccines are combination vaccines that also protect against feline herpesvirus and calicivirus. It can be administered under the skin or via the nose.
Gresham Animal Hospital is equipped to provide the service and treatment your pet needs under one roof. Keep Gresham Animal Hospital in mind next time your dog or cat needs a checkup, shots, or vaccines. Give us a call at 503.666.1600 to schedule an appointment today.

“You’ll see how much we know, and you’ll know how much we care.”